The Long and the Short of It: A guide to finance and investment for normally intelligent people who aren't in the industry

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The Long and the Short of It: A guide to finance and investment for normally intelligent people who aren't in the industry

The Long and the Short of It: A guide to finance and investment for normally intelligent people who aren't in the industry

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Marketing Week· This Much I’ve Learned: Les Binet and Peter Field on 10 years of the Long and Short of It In print for the very first time, The Long and Short of It collects eight unmi ssable short stories from the international bestselling Chronicles of St Mary's series. Suddenly the time-bending as well as space-bending genius of Kehlmann's construction is laid bare: we might not be able to get that excited nowadays about the Napoleonic wars - during which this novel is set - but reading Johanna's observation about cozying up makes us think about what people in the future may one day think about a present conflict, such as Iraq. I wish someone told me about this paper whilst I was studying marketing at university. It probably would have helped me understand where marketing fits within the wider business context a bit better. Binet and Field clearly communicate how long-term and short-term marketing strategies can work together, and they outline a suggested approach to divvying up the associated budget.

Roman Holiday Max and her team become spectacularly involved with Julius Caesar, Cleopatra and a basket of confused asps. Readers will learn everything they need to be their own investment manager. They will recognise their investment options, the institutions that try to sell them, and how to distinguish between fact and fiction in what companies say. They will discover the principles of sound investment and the research that supports these principles. Crucially, they will learn a practical investment strategy and how to implement it.

Perfect for a trivia night or a long trip, #TrainTeasers will both test your knowledge of this country`s rail system and enlighten you on the most colourful aspects of its long history. Meet trunk murderers, trainspotters, haters of railways, railway writers, Ministers for Transport good and bad, railway cats, dogs and a railway penguin. This is NOT a book for number-crunching nerds. Many of the answers are guessable by the intelligent reader. It is a quiz, yes, but also a cavalcade of historical incident and colour relating to a system that was the making of modern Britain. Bonpland provides a foil for Humboldt's otherworldliness during subsequent landfalls, always looking for the next shag while his master measures relative dampness and scratches moss off walls. Even though it is Humboldt who is investigating the real, it seems as though the very act of measurement is seducing him away from it, while Bonpland has no such illusions. So when we examined the data, what we expected to find was that the killer combination was emotional and rational together. But when we looked at [it], that is not what we found. What we found was actually quite different. We found that the more you moved away from rational messages to pure emotion, the more effective advertising was.”

Given that its theme is displacement, it is appropriate that the occasion of the novel is a journey. In September 1828, at von Humboldt's instigation, Gauss left his home town of Göttingen to attend the German Scientific Congress in Berlin. Although he meets von Humboldt by the end of the first chapter, it will take the whole book for there to be a meeting of minds between these two giants of the German intellect, with Kehlmann boxing and coxing between the two chapter by chapter. A lot of people in marketing weren’t even aware of what was going on. Behind their marketing world this heavy sell was going in at the C-suite, and companies were pulling money out of brand building and developing their own performance marketing operations, and marketing was missing out on that budget. So that became the rally cry as it was going on in a rather clandestine manner.”Both Humboldt and Gauss were concerned with the measurement of the world - with the displacement between one part of space and another and the relation of that gap to temporal intervals and theoretical absolutes. Humboldt constantly took readings during his vast journey - the height of every mountain, the line of the equator, the exact number of lice on the head of a servant - while Gauss conceived space as a mathematical reality in which even lines were merely an abstraction; yet his space was, in its way, as full of life as Humboldt's. A must-read for all marketers as well as anyone in senior leadership and holding the purse strings for the marketing budget. Although the duo didn’t set out to make the book a rallying call, that’s what it became, Field says. Brevity may be the soul of wit, but it is also much more. In this exploration of the shortest literary works—wise sayings, proverbs, witticisms, sardonic observations about human nature, pithy evocations of mystery, terse statements regarding ultimate questions—Gary Saul Morson argues passionately for the importance of these short genres not only to scholars but also to general readers. I also found it insightful that Binet and Field used Kahneman's theories and applied it to the marketing industry. Having an understanding of behavioural economics or consumer psychology will aid in the creation of media planning.

In this comprehensive discussion, Binet and Field also look ahead, sharing their thoughts on using digital channels for brand building –“it’s not about channels, it’s about mechanisms”, Binet says – measuring success online and making the case for marketing investment. But my rationale for studying economics had, from the beginning, been concerned for application. My career began to change direction when I was asked to join a group to review the structure of the British tax system. This group was established under the auspices of a newly established think tank, the Institute for Fiscal Studies, and was headed by James Meade, another economist who had achieved the ultimate distinction of a Nobel prize. Meade’s rigour was as demanding as that of Mirrlees, (both delivered it with extraordinary personal charm). But the most important effect of my experience with the Meade Committee was that I began to develop a taste for the popular exposition of economic concepts.

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Binet says the book came about as they “just wanted to know the truth” about how advertising really worked, after having an “epiphany” about emotional versus rational advertising while digging into the data for their first book, Marketing in the Era of Accountability. Morson's delightful study, which aims to classify and examine [aphorisms], is both a work of serious scholarship and a feast itself . . . The Long and Short of It leaves readers illuminated and humbled, amused and enlightened and with their sense of literature's richness—its ironies and foibles, its mysteries and truths—enhanced."

He adds: “We had the beginnings of a model where there were two quite different ways to communicate with people and we had a hunch it was also related to short and long term, so we then interrogated that in greater depth in The Long and the Short of It.” Along the way Napoleon has invaded Germany and been deposed, and Gauss has hardly noticed. Anyway, says Johanna, about conflict she already knows what he's going to say: "Looked at from the future, both sides would cancel each other out and before long nobody would be getting excited about the things people were dying for today." But, she adds, "What difference did that make? Cozying up to the future was a form of cowardice." It’s been 10 years since “godfathers of effectiveness” Les Binet and Peter Field published their book The Long and the Short of It. The Great St Mary's Day Out Hooray! Hooray! It's a happy holiday. For everyone except Max the only one with her mind on the job. If you're wanting to drive short-term sales, focus on creating communication strategies that use rational or logic in their advertisements.

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measurement of brand building activity should take place over at least a year (anything less and it will look like it’s underperformed) Brevity may be the soul of wit, but it is also much more. In this exploration of the shortest literary works-wise sayings, proverbs, witticisms, sardonic observations about human nature, pithy evocations of mystery, terse statements regarding ultimate questions-Gary Saul Morson argues passionately for the importance of these short genres not only to scholars but also to general readers. We are fascinated by how brief works evoke a powerful sense of life in a few words, which is why we browse quotation anthologies and love to repeat our favorites. Arguing that all short genres are short in their own way, Morson explores the unique form of brevity that each of them develops. Apothegms (Heraclitus, Lao Tzu, Wittgenstein) describe the universe as ultimately unknowable, offering not answers but ever deeper questions. Dicta (Spinoza, Marx, Freud) create the sense that unsolvable enigmas have at last been resolved. Sayings from sages and sacred texts assure us that goodness is rewarded, while sardonic maxims (Ecclesiastes, Nietzsche, George Eliot) uncover the self-deceptions behind such comforting illusions. Just as witticisms display the power of mind, and “witlessisms and ” (William Spooner, Dan Quayle, the persona assumed by Mark Twain) astonish with their spectacular stupidity. Nothing seems further from these short works than novels and epics, but the shortest genres often set the tone for longer ones, which, in turn, contain brilliant examples of short forms. Morson shows that short genres contribute important insights into the history of literature and philosophical thought. Once we grasp the role of aphorisms in Herodotus, Samuel Johnson, Dostoevsky, and even Tolstoy, we see their masterpieces in an entirely new light. The Long and Short of It: From Aphorism to Novel by Gary Morson – eBook Details Christmas Present An attempt to rescue lost historians involving an enraged pig and Boudicca herself.



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